Browsing articles in "Ministerial Media Releases"
Aug 11, 2008

$25 Million to FInd Solutions to Sydney’s Congestion

$25 Million to FInd Solutions to Sydney’s Congestion

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

August 11 2008

Detailed feasibility studies will start this month on two multi-billion infrastructure projects which have the very real potential to unclog some of Sydney’s key roads and modernise a significant part of its passenger rail network.

The Commonwealth and NSW governments have agreed the terms of the studies into the proposed Western Metro (Green Line) and upgrade of the M5 East.

Both governments have also stumped up the necessary cash.

All up, the Rudd Labor Government will provide $25 million to kick-start and accelerate this necessary work.  The Iemma Labor Government has agreed to manage the process and put in a further $20 million.

WESTERN METRO (GREEN LINE)…

The Green Line would be independent of the existing CityRail network, with transfer opportunities at key points.  The feasibility study will identify the best route options and develop a business case using estimates of patronage, revenue and cost.

 

On a typical weekday, almost a quarter of a million people travel by train between Parramatta and the CBD – and this is likely to rise significantly with predictions that the population of Greater Western Sydney will grow by another 500,000 over the next 25 years.

The feasibility study’s $30 million price tag will be paid by both the Commonwealth

($20 million) and NSW ($10 million) governments.

M5 EAST TRANSPORT CORRIDOR…

Upgrading of the M5 East corridor has the potential to support the thousands of additional trucks that will be heading to and from an expanded Port Botany as well as the rapidly growing suburbs of Sydney’s south west.

Already 96,000 vehicles a day use the M5 East and this is likely to grow not least because the number of containers moving through the Port is expected to more than double to 3.6 million in less than two decades.

The M5 East Transport Corridor study will be funded with $5 million from the Commonwealth Government and $10 million from the NSW Government.

We expect both studies to be finalised by the middle of next year.

After 12 years of inaction, the Rudd Labor Government is committed to reengaging the Commonwealth with cities policy, a central plank to Labor’s nation building agenda.

Aug 8, 2008

Minister and Local MP Inspect Torres Strait Emergency Response

Minister and Local MP Inspect Torres Strait Emergency Response

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

August 8 2008

The Australian Government’s emergency response vessel ETV Pacific Responder plays an important role in protecting the Torres Strait and northern Great Barrier Reef’s marine environment in the event of a shipping incident.

Today off Thursday Island, I and the Member for Leichhardt, Jim Turnour, met with the Australian crew on board ETV Pacific Responder and received an in-depth explanation of the vessel’s capabilities in emergency towage, pollution response, and search and rescue.

The tug is celebrating its second anniversary, under contract to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), in providing emergency response services to shipping incidents in the region.

In addition, it provides AMSA with maintenance and construction services for its aids to navigation network in the Torres Strait and northern Great Barrier Reef.

The Cairns-based vessel has responded to several shipping incidents in the region, including assisting Papua New Guinea authorities contain a cargo ship fire in the Torres Strait. It also assisted in the salvage operations for the “Pasha Bulker” incident at Newcastle last year.

There are no port-based tugs capable of emergency towage services in the Torres Strait and northern Great Barrier Reef.

The availability of ETV Pacific Responder to deal with shipping emergencies greatly reduces the risk of pollution and avoids several days’ delay while a tug responded from southern ports.

I also took the opportunity to familiarise myself with other aspects of AMSA’s operations in the region, including safety regulation of shipping and coastal pilotage services, pollution response preparedness and search and rescue.

Aug 6, 2008

General Aviation: An Industry in Transition

General Aviation: An Industry in Transition

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

August 6 2008

Today I’ve released a landmark report on the nation’s General Aviation industry – its current health and future challenges.

The report – written by the Strategic Industry Leaders Group – paints a picture of an industry in transition. While parts of the industry are growing and prospering, some smaller operators are struggling to remain viable.

The commercialisation of general aviation airports; skill shortages; a complex regulatory environment; and the ageing of the small aircraft fleet have all created a challenging operating environment.

The report clearly highlights some of the problems that have developed in the absence of a long term, coordinated strategic plan from the national government.

In part that’s why I recently announced the Government would develop Australia’s first-ever aviation White Paper to guide the industry’s growth over the next decade and beyond.

A major focus for the White Paper will be on ensuring a vibrant general aviation industry is able to prosper as the nurturing ground of future commercial pilots and aviation workers. It is being developed in close consultation with all sections of the Australian industry, including general aviation operators.

I would like to thank Dr Roland Williams and the Strategic Industry Leaders Group for their report. It will provide a valuable contribution to public debate and policy development.

The report is available at http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/aviation/general/

Aug 1, 2008

Rudd Government Delivers $230,000 for Rural and Regional Research

Rudd Government Delivers $230,000 for Rural and Regional Research

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

August 1 2008

The Rudd Labor Government is delivering more than $230,000 to support high quality research into rural and regional Australia and help establish closer links with communities.

Five projects are being supported through the Regional and Rural Research and Development Grants Program including a landmark study on the social impacts of drought in the Murray-Darling Basin, a Telethon Institute long-term study into children’s wellbeing and development in regional communities, and two studies addressing rural and regional labour shortages.

We are also supporting two major conferences, including the 2008 Desert Knowledge Symposium, to bring together regional experts and leaders and promote regional development.

Rural and regional communities faced serious challenges today with the worst drought on record, widespread infrastructure bottlenecks and persistent skills shortages.

Despite these challenges, Australia’s regions play a vital role in our economy – generating 65 per cent of export income and employing over a third of Australia’s workforce.

By supporting high-quality research and development projects, the Rudd Labor Government’s is recognising the resilience and innovation in our regional communities.

The seven projects we are contributing to are as follows:

  • $110,000 over four years to support a multi-partner research project in the Mandurah/Peel region of Western Australia focusing on the impact of the family and community environments on child development and wellbeing;
  • More than $38,000 for Charles Sturt University’s Centre for Social and Rural Research to assess the downstream social impacts of drought in the Murray-Darling Basin;
  • $11,000 towards a three year project at the University of Western Australia into “Regional Development diversification and addressing the rural labour shortage”;
  • $16,500 towards a three year project being undertaken by the Sydney University of Technology into “New Migrants in regional and rural Australia: attraction and retention”;
  • $11,000 towards a two year project being undertaken by the University of Western Australia into “What makes a Resilient Community”; 
  • $22,000 for sponsorship of the 2008 Desert Knowledge Symposium and Business Showcase being held in Alice Springs; and
  • $22,000 for sponsorship of the 2008 Australian and New Zealand Regional Science Association International national conference in Adelaide.
Jul 25, 2008

Ministers Agree to Modernise the Nation’s Transport Sector

Ministers Agree to Modernise the Nation’s Transport Sector

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 25 2008

The nation’s transport ministers have taken another important step towards modernising the Federation, helping to create a seamless national economy and reducing the cost of doing business.

We are determined to improve the way we as a nation regulate our vital maritime, rail and trucking industries.

Meeting for the third time this year, the nation’s transport ministers have agreed to recommend to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) that subject to the outcomes of regulatory impact assessments, it give its in principle support for the establishment of:

  •  A National Road Safety Council – a practical response to statistics showing that the national road toll has changed little since 2003;
  •  A single national system of heavy vehicle regulation and the adoption of a consistent approach to heavy vehicle driver licensing; and
  • A single national system of maritime safety regulation administered by the existing Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA). At present in Australia, there are more than 50 pieces of legislation and subordinate legislative instruments pertaining to maritime safety along with eight independent maritime safety agencies.

These recommendations will be put to COAG in October.

The Australian Transport Council (ATC) has also agreed to progress work on establishing a single national rail safety regulator and investigator.

These long overdue, commonsense reforms would free the $46 billion transport sector from complex and inconsistent government regulations, allowing it can get on with the job of moving people and freight around the country.

Communiqué below

 

Australian Transport Ministers’ Meeting 25 July 2008, Sydney Record of Outcomes

Transport Ministers from the Commonwealth and each Australian State and Territory met in Sydney today to take forward ATC’s national action plan, A New Beginning for Transport, agreed at the Australian Transport Council’s meeting in May. The plan encompasses a number of key national reforms designed to cut down red tape in the transport and logistics sector and deliver more consistency in the way transport is regulated across Australia.

Ministers agreed to recommend to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) meeting in October that, subject to the outcomes of regulatory impact assessments, COAG endorse in-principle the establishment of:

  • a National Road Safety Council;
  • a single national system of heavy vehicle regulation, registration and driver licensing; and
  • a single national system for maritime safety regulation administered by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA).

Ministers also instructed the National Transport Commission to prepare a regulatory impact statement (RIS) for a single, national rail safety regulatory and investigation framework.

The Australian Transport Council (ATC, comprising Transport Ministers together with the Australian Local Government Association) would prepare the terms of Inter Governmental Agreements to underpin these proposed national arrangements for COAG’s consideration in early 2009.

National Road Safety Council

Ministers agreed that the objective of the National Road Safety Council would be to enhance implementation of key reforms from the National Road Safety Strategy and other ATC-agreed road safety reforms by raising the profile of road safety across government, business and the broader community through high level partnerships across key sectors.

The Council’s membership would include community leaders and experts from the business, government, academic and community sectors, with expertise in key elements of road safety and/or other essential area. Subject to COAG’s agreement, the Council would meet early 2009.

Ministers also agreed to consider at ATC’s November 2008 meeting a review of existing road safety management and governance processes to avoid duplication with the new National Council.

National Maritime Regulation

Ministers agreed that, subject to the outcome of the regulatory impact assessment, they support a national approach to Maritime Safety regulation and are inclined towards broadening the application of the Commonwealth Navigation Act 1912 to apply to all commercial vessels. This will involve AMSA becoming responsible for regulating vessel design, construction, and equipment, vessel operation (eg safety management systems) and crew certification and manning.

In considering the arrangements which would underpin a national system, Ministers agreed to explore the option of existing State and Northern Territory maritime agencies being the delivery agents for regulatory services under individual agreements with AMSA.

The first step in the process to establish a single national system will involve the preparation of a Regulatory Impact Statement for consideration by ATC at its November meeting.

National Heavy Vehicle Regulation, Registration, Driver Licensing

In proposing to COAG a new framework for the regulation of the heavy vehicle industry, the Transport Ministers agreed that the framework could involve:

  • the establishment of a single regulation entity by July 2009;
  • the implementation of a single national heavy vehicle registration scheme in 2010;
  • the adoption of a consistent approach to heavy vehicle driver competency and testing standards and heavy vehicle driver training school recognition in 2010; and
  • delivery of a single physical national heavy vehicle driver licence in 2010.

National heavy vehicle laws would encompass the breadth of current heavy vehicle regulation, registration and licensing, including such matters as roadworthiness, mass and loading, fatigue and speed. In recognition of the complexity associated with road use pricing and network access, Ministers agreed that these two areas of regulation would be considered over time by ATC and COAG.

It is envisaged that by 1 July 2009, the Commonwealth would prepare legislation to establish a ‘Federal Registration Scheme’ (FRS) to apply to all heavy vehicles. Initially, the FRS would work in the same manner as the current ‘Federal Interstate Registration Scheme’ with all customer service transactions being handled by State and Territory agencies and data records continuing to be managed within the jurisdictions’ general registration computer systems.

Licensing reforms will be implemented by all jurisdictions in 2010 delivering a consistent approach to minimum standards for competency and testing for heavy vehicle driver licences, starting with Heavy Rigid and Heavy Combination classes, and recognising heavy vehicle driver training schools’ training and testing of drivers.

To support implementation of this very significant reform agenda, and in anticipation of COAG’s confirmation of the directions being pursued, ATC has agreed to establish a National Heavy Vehicle Regulation Implementation Team to develop the necessary regulatory impact assessments, Inter-Governmental Agreements, draft laws and design the structure, functions, resourcing and funding arrangements to deliver these future arrangements.

Rail safety regulation and investigation

ATC will consider the NTC’s RIS on a single, national rail safety regulatory and investigation framework in early 2009, and make a recommendation to COAG’s first meeting next year. The RIS will consider all viable options for establishing a single, national system, and will consult with stakeholders in the preparation of the RIS.

Ministers reaffirmed that in the interim all jurisdictions would proceed with the model rail safety legislation previously agreed by COAG.

Progressing ATC’s National Transport Policy

Ministers also noted progress reports from each of the Working Groups developing aspect of the National Transport Policy. Ministers expressed satisfaction at the significant progress being made by the Working Groups and noted that the substantive issues would be discussed at the 7 November ATC meeting.

Ministers noted the importance of the national stocktake being undertaken by the Workforce planning and skills working group of labour skills, education and training shortages across the transport and logistics workforce. Ministers agreed to fast-track the deadline for completion and consideration of this work to the November ATC meeting.

Working Groups include:

  • Economic framework for an efficient transportation marketplace
  • Infrastructure planning and investment
  • Capacity constraints and supply chain performance
  • Urban congestion
  • Climate change, environment and energy
  • Safety and security
  • Strategic research and technology, and
  • Workforce planning and skills.

The Australian Transport Ministers meeting was attended by:

 The

Hon Anthony Albanese MP
Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government (Commonwealth)
 The

Hon John Watkins MLA 

Minister for Transport (

New South Wales ) 

 The

Hon Eric Roozendaal MLC
Minister for Roads (

New South Wales ) 
 The

Hon Lynne Kosky MP 
Minister for Public Transport (

Victoria ) 
 
The Hon

Tim Pallas MP 
Minister for Roads and Ports (

Victoria )

The

Hon Warren Pitt MP

Minister for Main Roads and Local Government (

Queensland ) 
Gary Fenlon MP  Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Transport, Trade, Employment and Industrial Relations (

Queensland )  
The

Hon Alannah MacTiernan MLA 
Minister for Planning and Infrastructure (

Western Australia )
The

Hon Patrick Conlon MHA  
Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and  Energy (

South Australia ) 
The

Hon Graeme Sturges MP  
Minister for Infrastructure (

Tasmania )  

The

Hon John Hargreaves MLA

Minister for Territory and Municipal Services (ACT)  

 

 

Jul 23, 2008

28 per cent More Seats on Routes Between Australia and Thailand

28 per cent More Seats on Routes Between Australia and Thailand

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 23 2008

Thai and Australian airlines are now able to offer additional passenger and freight services between and beyond our two countries, thanks to new aviation arrangements negotiated by the Rudd Labor Government.

The Australia/Thailand aviation market is Australia’s 6th largest, with 980,000 people travelling between our two countries in the twelve months to May this year – up almost 20 per cent on the previous twelve month period.

Without doubt, Thailand has become a popular destination for Australian families wanting a holiday and backpackers looking for adventure.

The new agreement will provide many benefits to both country’s airlines and economies, including:

  • More seats. The maximum number of possible weekly flights increases immediately from 35 to 40 B747-400 equivalent services – and to 45 from March 2009. These services can be operated with various types of aircraft between any of the international airports in Australia and Thailand.
  • Greater flexibility. The number of code share services that can be operated in conjunction with the airlines of third countries increases immediately from 28 to 35 weekly services – and to 40 from March 2009.
  • Unlimited freight services. The previous limit of 7 all-cargo services per week has been completely removed. Airlines can now operate any number of all-cargo services on any route; take on and set down cargo when operating via a third country or beyond; and use their own or leased planes.

From March next year, the maximum number of seats on flights between Australia and Thailand will reach over 1.87 million each year – 28.6 per cent more than were available under the old bilateral aviation arrangements.

The only remaining limit on passenger services are those restricting Thai carriers from flying via the United States to Australia and beyond Australia to the United States. Similarly, Australian airlines will still not be allowed to fly to and from the People’s Republic of China via any Thai airport.

Through deals like the one we have just negotiated with the Government of Thailand, the Rudd Labor Government is successfully liberalising the international aviation market while protecting the national interest – an approach that’s reducing air fares for Australians and providing economic opportunities for the Australian aviation industry.

Jul 23, 2008

New Deal Makes it Easier for Australians to Experience Brazil

New Deal Makes it Easier for Australians to Experience Brazil

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 23 2008

I am pleased to announce the further liberalisation of aviation arrangements between Australia and Brazil: opening up the possibility of more flights and a greater choice of destinations.

Brazil is the most popular South American destination for Australians travelling abroad, with over 60,000 people flying to and from Brazil last year for a holiday, to visit family or do business.

In fact, the number of people travelling between our two countries is up significantly, with average annual growth in the Australia/Brazil market of around 15 per cent over the past five years.

Reached earlier this month, the new, less restrictive bilateral agreement will support and sustain this growth into the coming years.

The new agreement:

  • Doubles the maximum entitlements for each country’s airlines from seven to fourteen weekly flights;
  • Provides more flexibility to Australian and Brazilian carriers wanting to take on and set down passengers at any points between and beyond both countries – allowing airlines to plan ahead and improving the commercial viability of future country to country services;
  • Allows the airlines of both countries to market seats on any airline which operate into either country, including the airlines of third countries;
  • Makes it possible for both Australian and Brazilian airlines to enter into code share arrangements involving services via the United States on airlines with rights to operate on the relevant routes;
  • Increases the weekly frequency of all-cargo flights from three to seven.

Greater capacity and the removal of most restrictions on air routes between Australia and Brazil will over time provide more choice for travellers, offer new marketing opportunities for the tourism industry and allow our airlines to take advantage of the rapidly growing economies of South America.

In just eight months, the Rudd Labor Government has delivered new leadership: actively pursing the liberalisation of the international aviation market while at all times protecting the national interest.

Jul 22, 2008

Australia Signs Up to New Global Car Safety Regulation

Australia Signs Up to New Global Car Safety Regulation

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 22 2008

Technology with the potential to save the lives of hundreds of motorists and other road users each year could soon be fitted as standard to all new Australian cars, 4WDs and utes.

The Rudd Labor Government has joined an international push for consistent, world-wide technical standards for Electronic Stability Control (ESC) – a computer-based system which helps drivers keep control of their vehicles, particularly in adverse driving conditions such as wet weather.

Along with other members of the World Forum for Harmonisation of Vehicle Standards, Australia has voted to adopt a new Global Technical Regulation (GTR) on ESC systems.

International research has found this technology has the potential to be the greatest innovation since the seatbelt in saving lives and making our roads significantly safer.

Research undertaken for the British Government found vehicles equipped with ESC are 25 per cent less likely to be involved in a fatal accident than those without it.

According to the US Department of Transportation, this technology, when fully deployed, could save up to 9,600 lives annually. From 2011, ESC will be required on all new passenger vehicles sold in the United States.

ESC continuously monitors a vehicle’s speed, steering wheel angle, direction of travel and cornering acceleration. If this data shows the vehicle is at risk of skidding or overturning, the system automatically applies individual brakes to correct any deviation from the direction the driver wants to go.

WHAT DOES THE ESC VOTE MEAN FOR THE LOCAL CAR INDUSTRY?

The new Global Technical Regulation opens the way for a detailed examination of the case for mandating ESC in Australia through the development of an Australian Design Rule (ADR).

Within weeks, a Regulation Impact Statement (RIS) assessing the potential ramifications for industry and the wider community of an ESC mandate will be released for public consultation.

The RIS will look at a range of issues including whether the goal of safer vehicles can be achieved via non-regulatory means.

If the case for an ADR is established, we expect to get the necessary legislation in place by the end of 2008.

Already many Australians appreciate the safety benefits of ESC, with almost half of the new cars and 4WDs sold in December fitted with the technology. What’s more, a growing number of manufacturers are voluntarily responding to the needs of the marketplace and including ESC as a standard feature in their latest models.

WHAT IS THE WORLD FORUM FOR HARMONISATION OF VEHICLE REGULATIONS?

The World Forum is a United Nations (UN) body charged with administering the 1958 Agreement on the Adoption of Uniform Technical Prescriptions for Vehicles and the 1998 “Global Agreement” on Global Technical Regulations for Wheeled Vehicles, Equipment and Parts.

Fifty countries, as well as car manufacturers, consumers and road users, participate in its deliberations.

Over the last half century, the 1958 Agreement has put in place 127 Regulations which are regularly updated in accordance with the latest technological progress and scientific breakthroughs.

The World Forum is currently working on GTRs for hydrogen and fuel-cell vehicles, as well as measures to improve the testing and reporting of engine efficiency and reduce harmful exhaust emissions.

Jul 18, 2008

9.5 Million more passengers are flying on Regional Air Routes

9.5 Million more passengers are flying on Regional Air Routes

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 18 2008

More people than ever before are flying to and from regional Australia to visit family, take a holiday or do business.

That’s the main finding of the most comprehensive report ever written on aviation services beyond our capital cities which I’m releasing today: Air transport services in regional Australia: trends and access.

Between 1984 and 2005 the annual number of passengers flying on regional air routes rose from 6.5 million to 16 million, with growth averaging 4.4 per cent a year.

The strong passenger figures reflect the strength of many regional economies as well as the success of the tourism marketing campaigns and more affordable ticket prices.

But the good news of an extra 9.5 million passengers flying on regional routes is tempered by the report’s other findings:

UNEVEN GROWTH

  •  Annual growth in passenger numbers was strongest on routes between major cities and major tourist destinations (7.9 per cent) – routes often operated by major airlines using high capacity aircraft. Growth on these routes – for example, Melbourne–Hamilton Island – even exceeded the growth record on routes between the capital cities.
  •  By contrast, the annual growth on routes between major cities and other regional centres averaged 4.2 per cent; while passenger traffic between regional centres – for example, Dubbo–Parkes – fell by an average of 1.5 per cent a year.

LESS AIRPORTS, HALF THE ROUTES

  •  The number of regional airports served by airlines declined from 278 to 170. Almost half of the regional routes (401) have been cancelled – particularly those with infrequent services, very few passengers and covering short distances.

FEWER AIRLINES

  • The level of market concentration has increased over time, with fewer airlines carrying the growing number of passengers. What’s more, of the 35 airlines serving regional airports in 2005, only five had operated continuously since 1984.

REGIONAL AUSTRALIA AND AN AVIATION WHITE PAPER…

If regional Australia is to continue reaping the economic and social benefits of aviation, we need to plan ahead now. As well as the long term changes outlined above, regional services are also adversely affected by more immediate difficulties such as a lack of pilots and rising fuel costs.

That’s why the Rudd Labor Government has announced it will develop Australia’s first aviation White Paper to guide the industry growth over the next decade and beyond.

Public comment is a vital part of this process and I urge all those with an interest in the future of the Australian aviation industry to consider making a submission to the Green Paper when it’s released in September.

The White Paper should be finalised by the middle of next year.

Reports like the one I’m releasing today will also inform the Government’s deliberations.

More information about the development of the aviation White Paper can be found at http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/aviation/nap/.

REGIONAL AVIATION AND LABOR’S FIRST BUDGET…

In the meantime, the Government has used its first budget to make sure remote communities continue to receive regular, essential access to a weekly air service.

We have more than doubled funding for the Remote Air Services Subsidy (RASS) Scheme, subsidising weekly flights for Australians living in 239 remote and isolated areas who do not otherwise have access to a regular air service.

The flights deliver a weekly passenger and freight service. Goods delivered include medicines, fresh food and educational materials. Australia Post uses some of the same air operators to deliver mail. The funding boost reflects the increased cost of flying these routes, due in part to higher fuel prices.

The Budget also invests in measures to strengthen security at regional airports.

The Air transport services in regional Australia: trends and access report will be a valuable reference source for policy development and a benchmark for assessing future trends. More importantly, with the development of a consistent historical database we are now able to more accurately project future growth.

The publication was prepared by the Government’s Bureau of Infrastructure Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) and can be downloaded from: www.bitre.gov.au.

 

Routes that Recorded Biggest rise in Passenger Numbers in 2007
     Change (%)
 Hamilton Island (QLD)  Melbourne (VIC)    68
 Maroochydore (QLD)  Melbourne (VIC)  60
 Cairns (QLD)  Melbourne (VIC)  55
 Melbourne (VIC)  Williamtown (NSW)  45
 Alice Springs (NT)  Melbourne (VIC)  45
 Brisbane (QLD)   Williamtown (NSW)  44
 Broome (WA)   Karratha (WA)  39
 Katherine-Tind (NT)  Victoria River (NT)  35
 Cairns (QLD)  Karumba (QLD)  34
 Melbourne (VIC)  Wagga Wagga (NSW)  31
 Kalkgurung (NT)  Victoria River (NT)  31
 Learmonth (WA)  Perth (WA)  31

 

 

Routes that recorded the biggest fall in 2007
     Change (%)
 Orange (NSW) –  Parkes (NSW) – 43
 Bundaberg (QLD)  Rockhampton (QLD)  -45
 Broken Hill (NSW)  Sydney (NSW)  -47
 Elcho Island (NT)  Maningrida (NT)   -47
 Albany (WA)  Esperance (WA)  -52
 Hamilton Island (QLD)  Townsville (QLD)   -56
 Williamtown (NSW)  Port Macquarie (NSW)  -60
 Dubbo (NSW)  Parkes (NSW)  -60
 Adelaide (SA)  Kalgoorlie (WA)  -61
 Coober Pedy (SA)  Olympic Dam (SA )  -61
 Coffs Harbour (NSW) Williamtown (NSW)  -64
 Katherine-Tind (NT)  Tennant Creek (NT)  -80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 18, 2008

Strong Interest in the Future of the Aviation Industry

Strong Interest in the Future of the Aviation Industry

MEDIA RELEASE

The Hon Anthony Albanese

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Local Government

Leader of the House

Member for Grayndler

July 18 2008

More than 250 organisations, government agencies and individuals have answered the call, submitting their proposals for securing the future of the Australian aviation industry.

The large number of responses to the Issues Paper – released by the Government in April – reflects the community’s keen interest in having their say on the immediate and longer term challenges facing Australia’s aviation industry.

They provide a valuable collection of views and ideas that will contribute to the formulation of a ‘Green Paper’ which will be released for community and industry input in September.

Ultimately, by the middle of next year this two-stage, consultative process will have led to the nation’s first ever aviation White Paper – a document that will guide the industry’s growth over the coming decades.

I am greatly encouraged by the constructive contribution all sections of the industry and the broader community have made to this important policy development process and the quality of the submissions received.

Amongst all the submissions there is a widespread acknowledgement that if Australia is to continue benefiting from the economic and social advantages of air travel then we need to start planning now – the previous short term, ad-hoc, problem by problem approach is longer tenable.

The submissions cover a wide issues including: airport regulations; noise; safety; security; international and domestic air services policies; skill shortages; and environmental.

More than ever, the aviation industry underpins domestic economic growth and provides an essential gateway to the global economy. At present, it directly supports nearly 50,000 jobs and contributes $6.8 billion to Australia’s GDP.

Submissions can be downloaded from: http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/aviation/nap/index.aspx

Contact Anthony

(02) 9564 3588 Electorate Office

Email: [email protected]

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