Browsing articles in "Interview Transcripts"
Nov 27, 2005

National Nine News: Nuclear Power

National Nine News – Weekend Edition

Brendan Nelson announces investigation into a Nuclear Power Industry in Australia

27 November 2005

Mike Munro: The controversial issue of Australia using nuclear energy is firmly back on the agenda. Science Minister Brendan Nelson has proposed an extensive enquiry into the option, the Prime Minister now deciding if the investigation should proceed.

Reporter: It’s the most contentious of all power sources, nuclear energy, and now a major scientific investigation into a nuclear industry to power Australia is on the table.

Brendan Nelson: I think we owe it to our future to examine all of our options.

Reporter: And that includes building the countries first nuclear power plant. With rising energy demands, our own major uranium stocks and global warming caused by fossil fuels, Dr Nelson together with Industry Minister Ian McFarland have put forward a submission to John Howard calling for a one million dollar inquiry by the Australian Academy Science. The brief would be extensive.

Brendan Nelson: The geological, the environmental, the physical, the social science and all of those aspects of examining the prospect of a nuclear power industry in Australia.

Bob Brown: Nuclear power is not he answer to global warning. It in fact just simply raised the hazards out of energy production.

Reporter: Labor is also not impressed.

Anthony Albanese: They have no mandate to put this proposition forward. It is quite clear that Australia rejects nuclear power.

Reporter: Dr Nelson isn’t saying where a proposed nuclear power station would be located or where it would dump the high level radioactive waste saying it would be a matter for the government of the day.

As to whether this inquiry now goes ahead, that’s now in the hands of the Prime Minister.

 

Nov 27, 2005

National Nine News: Nuclear Power

National Nine News – Weekend Edition

Brendan Nelson announces investigation into a Nuclear Power Industry in Australia

27 November 2005

Mike Munro: The controversial issue of Australia using nuclear energy is firmly back on the agenda. Science Minister Brendan Nelson has proposed an extensive enquiry into the option, the Prime Minister now deciding if the investigation should proceed.

Reporter: It’s the most contentious of all power sources, nuclear energy, and now a major scientific investigation into a nuclear industry to power Australia is on the table.

Brendan Nelson: I think we owe it to our future to examine all of our options.

Reporter: And that includes building the countries first nuclear power plant. With rising energy demands, our own major uranium stocks and global warming caused by fossil fuels, Dr Nelson together with Industry Minister Ian McFarland have put forward a submission to John Howard calling for a one million dollar inquiry by the Australian Academy Science. The brief would be extensive.

Brendan Nelson: The geological, the environmental, the physical, the social science and all of those aspects of examining the prospect of a nuclear power industry in Australia.

Bob Brown: Nuclear power is not he answer to global warning. It in fact just simply raised the hazards out of energy production.

Reporter: Labor is also not impressed.

Anthony Albanese: They have no mandate to put this proposition forward. It is quite clear that Australia rejects nuclear power.

Reporter: Dr Nelson isn’t saying where a proposed nuclear power station would be located or where it would dump the high level radioactive waste saying it would be a matter for the government of the day.

As to whether this inquiry now goes ahead, that’s now in the hands of the Prime Minister.

 

Oct 31, 2005

Transcript of Doorstop Interview – Proposed Anti-Terrorism Laws

TRANSCRIPT OF DOORSTOP, PARLIAMENT HOUSE, CANBERRA

31 October 2005

Subject: Proposed Anti-Terrorism Laws

JOURNALIST: Are you concerned about the anti terrorism laws proposed by the government?

ALBANESE: This issue was discussed yesterday in the National Left meeting and like everyone in the Labor Party we are concerned that in ensuring Australia’s security there are appropriate safeguards put in place to make sure that the freedom that we’re protecting we don’t give up on the way through.

JOURNALIST: What freedoms in particular are you talk about – human rights, civil rights?

ALBANESE: Well there have been a range of issues raised regarding peoples civil rights, regarding appropriate judicial overview, regarding consistency with the international covenant on civil and political rights. Peter Garrett has raised concerns regarding the application of some of the sedition provisions. So we are concerned along with everyone in the Labor Party including the State Premiers and Chief Ministers to make sure that this legislation is right.

JOURNALIST: Are you disappointed that Kim Beazley hasn’t said any of this until now? He’s been wanting to be a bit tougher with John Howard.

ALBANESE: No, the issues which Kim Beazley raised are appropriate. Kim Beazley raised, consistent with Labor Party policy, the need to make sure that racial and religious vilification could be included as part of these provisions. Now we do have security issues in this country. We do need to make sure and indeed we have a responsibility to ensure the security of our citizens. So it is matter of getting it right. I think the Labor party is united about that. The Labor Party spokespeople in these areas, Arch Bevis and Nicola Roxon have made that very clear in the last week and we have a consistent position on this. We just need to make sure we get the laws right.

Thank you.

 

Oct 31, 2005

Transcript of Doorstop Interview – Proposed Anti-Terrorism Laws

TRANSCRIPT OF DOORSTOP, PARLIAMENT HOUSE, CANBERRA

31 October 2005

Subject: Proposed Anti-Terrorism Laws

JOURNALIST: Are you concerned about the anti terrorism laws proposed by the government?

ALBANESE: This issue was discussed yesterday in the National Left meeting and like everyone in the Labor Party we are concerned that in ensuring Australia’s security there are appropriate safeguards put in place to make sure that the freedom that we’re protecting we don’t give up on the way through.

JOURNALIST: What freedoms in particular are you talk about – human rights, civil rights?

ALBANESE: Well there have been a range of issues raised regarding peoples civil rights, regarding appropriate judicial overview, regarding consistency with the international covenant on civil and political rights. Peter Garrett has raised concerns regarding the application of some of the sedition provisions. So we are concerned along with everyone in the Labor Party including the State Premiers and Chief Ministers to make sure that this legislation is right.

JOURNALIST: Are you disappointed that Kim Beazley hasn’t said any of this until now? He’s been wanting to be a bit tougher with John Howard.

ALBANESE: No, the issues which Kim Beazley raised are appropriate. Kim Beazley raised, consistent with Labor Party policy, the need to make sure that racial and religious vilification could be included as part of these provisions. Now we do have security issues in this country. We do need to make sure and indeed we have a responsibility to ensure the security of our citizens. So it is matter of getting it right. I think the Labor party is united about that. The Labor Party spokespeople in these areas, Arch Bevis and Nicola Roxon have made that very clear in the last week and we have a consistent position on this. We just need to make sure we get the laws right.

Thank you.

 

Oct 18, 2005

Transcript of Doorstop Interview – Danna Vale’s plans to recreat Anzac Cove

TRANSCRIPT OF DOORSTOP, THE DOMAIN, SYDNEY

18 OCTOBER 2005

Subjects: Passing of William Allan; Danna Vale’s plan to recreate Anzac Cove; Barry Jones

ALBANESE: I would like to begin by paying respect to William Allan, the last Australian to actually fight in World War One. Mr Allan fought in both World Wars and passed away at age 106 and all Australians will mark this sad day as an important part in our history. Jack Ross, the one remaining WWI veteran, signed up but didn’t actually engage in the conflict.

I am here to talk about Danna Vale’s crazy plan for a replacement ANZAC Cove theme park to be put at Point Nepean. Having asked for the road works which have destroyed the integrity of ANZAC Cove at Gallipoli, Danna Vale is now asking for a theme park at Point Nepean so that we can have re-enactments of the ANZAC conflict.

This is a plan which would be seen as a sick joke were it not serious – were it not from someone who was a Minister in the Howard Government, who requested the road-works that have lead to the changing of the Anzac Cove site forever.

This comes just one week after the Senate Report found, and I quote, that “Australian authorities and the Australian Government were complacent in their response to allegations and evidence that this damage was occurring.”

This provides an insight into the mentality of the Howard Government when it comes to respecting our heritage, respecting what those great Australians did for our country in 1915. It comes from a government that thinks it is appropriate to play Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees as part of the warm up ceremony for the commemoration that occurred for 90th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings this year.

Danna Vale has put forward a proposal that is perhaps more in tune with Las Vegas.

In Las Vegas what they do is they recreate the Venice canals, they recreate the pyramids, but it is an environment that is about entertainment, it is about frivolous entertainment, it is about gambling. It is not about respect that is appropriate for the ANZAC Cove site.

What’s more Danna Vale has chosen a site in Point Nepean which itself is of significant heritage value and environmental sensitivity to make this proposition that it be turned into a theme park.

It is an absurd proposition from a former Government Minister who was part of Government that has no respect for Australian heritage.

JOURNALIST: Do you think that she is trying to atone for the shemozzle that was the road-works?

ALBANESE: Well, perhaps she is but what she has really done is provide an insight into the mentality that could ask for road-works without putting in place any mechanism to monitor the road-works so that the heritage of the site was protected.

JOURNALIST: How do you think the diggers and their families will feel about it?

ALBANESE: Well, the response that has come from diggers today is an immediate rejection of this absurd proposition. We have here in Australia the Australian War Memorial, an appropriate national site to give respect to our diggers. We also have war memorials, ANZAC statues and sites, not just in capital cities but in every regional town, in most suburbs which pay proper respect to the contribution that Australian generations that have come before us have made.

JOURNALIST: From your dealings with Danna Vale over the years, is she a complete idiot?

ALBANESE: Well, the Howard Government made her the Minister for Veterans Affairs. She has been followed by Deane Kelly as Minister for Veterans Affairs who thinks that it appropriate to play Stayin’ Alive during the ANZAC Day commemorations. So, I see this proposition as consistent with a Veterans Affairs Minister who would request road-works without putting in place any protection for the heritage at that site.

I see it as consistent with a new Minster who would play Stayin’ Alive at the commemorations, and it has got to be said that when Labor first raised this issue in question time, about the destruction that was occurring at ANZAC Cove, the Prime Minster’s response was that it was regrettable that the question had even been asked.

The Prime Minster, John Howard, has defended his Ministers consistently throughout this whole sorry saga.

JOURNALIST: Barry Jones, the current federal President of the ALP inaudible] no significant policy debate in the ALP since 1981 [inaudible].

ALBANESE: I think that says more about Barry than it does about anything. Since 1981 we have had 13 years of the Hawke/Keating Government at which we restructured the Australian economy, at which we protected significant environment sites such as the Franklin, Kakadu and Uluru, at which we reformed the welfare-to-work structures. We currently have policies out there on a range of issues, from national security to the need to have a skilled workforce and skill up Australia. We need Australia to go the high wage, high skill road rather than the low road that is put forward by these draconian industrial relations changes put forward by the Government.

JOURNALIST: He says that you are suffering from policy anorexia.

ALBANESE: Well, Barry Jones is entitled to make whatever comments that he likes, but if you look at the range of policy areas across the board. On this area today Labor has been out there arguing for the protection of our heritage. We want to see put in place a protection plan in accordance with the Senate inquiry that was put forward last week. On the area of the environment, the most important, significant issue is climate change. Labor has policies that state that we will ratify the Kyoto Protocol; that we will increase the Mandatory Renewable Energy Target; that we would engage in terms of a reduction in our emissions by establishing a national emissions trading scheme

JOURNALIST: This is the Federal President of the ALP [inaudible].

ALBANESE: Well, if Barry Jones can argue that Labor hasn’t put forward things since 1981 I think he will be judged poorly. The fact is that we have put forward significant policies this year alone and we are putting forward policies that are filling the gaps that the Howard Government has created.

JOURNALIST: What do you think of the description that the Party is being run by factional warlords now?

ALBANESE: Barry was a member of a faction like other people. He was elected as a Minister as a member of a faction. The Liberal Party has factions. What we are seeing at the moment is the Howard faction and the Costello faction fighting it out day by day, on every policy issue, in every debate that is occurring. John Howard and Peter Costello, the backdrop of which, whether it be tax, whether it is the industrial relations changes, it is all about whether Costello has the guts to challenge Howard or not, and what the response should be.

JOURNALIST: Should Barry Jones resign from his position?

ALBANESE: Barry Jones was elected to that position. He is entitled to hold it.

JOURNALIST: So, he is entitled to hold that job and hold the views that he holds?

ALBANESE: The Labor Party is a democratic party.

JOURNALIST: But you have no problem with him staying as Federal President and holding those views?

ALBANESE: The Labor Party is a democratic party.

JOURNALIST: He says it is not. He says it is run by factional warlords like yourself.

ALBANESE: That is interesting given that he is the National President democratically elected by the Party, who came second in the ballot which all ALP members had a vote in, to Carmen Lawrence.

JOURNALIST: [inaudible]

ALBANESE: [inaudible] The real issue is Labor advancing our positive agenda and the Howard/Costello Government being in a state of internal warfare.

[ENDS]

 

Oct 18, 2005

Transcript of Doorstop Interview – Danna Vale’s plans to recreat Anzac Cove

TRANSCRIPT OF DOORSTOP, THE DOMAIN, SYDNEY

18 OCTOBER 2005

Subjects: Passing of William Allan; Danna Vale’s plan to recreate Anzac Cove; Barry Jones

ALBANESE: I would like to begin by paying respect to William Allan, the last Australian to actually fight in World War One. Mr Allan fought in both World Wars and passed away at age 106 and all Australians will mark this sad day as an important part in our history. Jack Ross, the one remaining WWI veteran, signed up but didn’t actually engage in the conflict.

I am here to talk about Danna Vale’s crazy plan for a replacement ANZAC Cove theme park to be put at Point Nepean. Having asked for the road works which have destroyed the integrity of ANZAC Cove at Gallipoli, Danna Vale is now asking for a theme park at Point Nepean so that we can have re-enactments of the ANZAC conflict.

This is a plan which would be seen as a sick joke were it not serious – were it not from someone who was a Minister in the Howard Government, who requested the road-works that have lead to the changing of the Anzac Cove site forever.

This comes just one week after the Senate Report found, and I quote, that “Australian authorities and the Australian Government were complacent in their response to allegations and evidence that this damage was occurring.”

This provides an insight into the mentality of the Howard Government when it comes to respecting our heritage, respecting what those great Australians did for our country in 1915. It comes from a government that thinks it is appropriate to play Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees as part of the warm up ceremony for the commemoration that occurred for 90th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings this year.

Danna Vale has put forward a proposal that is perhaps more in tune with Las Vegas.

In Las Vegas what they do is they recreate the Venice canals, they recreate the pyramids, but it is an environment that is about entertainment, it is about frivolous entertainment, it is about gambling. It is not about respect that is appropriate for the ANZAC Cove site.

What’s more Danna Vale has chosen a site in Point Nepean which itself is of significant heritage value and environmental sensitivity to make this proposition that it be turned into a theme park.

It is an absurd proposition from a former Government Minister who was part of Government that has no respect for Australian heritage.

JOURNALIST: Do you think that she is trying to atone for the shemozzle that was the road-works?

ALBANESE: Well, perhaps she is but what she has really done is provide an insight into the mentality that could ask for road-works without putting in place any mechanism to monitor the road-works so that the heritage of the site was protected.

JOURNALIST: How do you think the diggers and their families will feel about it?

ALBANESE: Well, the response that has come from diggers today is an immediate rejection of this absurd proposition. We have here in Australia the Australian War Memorial, an appropriate national site to give respect to our diggers. We also have war memorials, ANZAC statues and sites, not just in capital cities but in every regional town, in most suburbs which pay proper respect to the contribution that Australian generations that have come before us have made.

JOURNALIST: From your dealings with Danna Vale over the years, is she a complete idiot?

ALBANESE: Well, the Howard Government made her the Minister for Veterans Affairs. She has been followed by Deane Kelly as Minister for Veterans Affairs who thinks that it appropriate to play Stayin’ Alive during the ANZAC Day commemorations. So, I see this proposition as consistent with a Veterans Affairs Minister who would request road-works without putting in place any protection for the heritage at that site.

I see it as consistent with a new Minster who would play Stayin’ Alive at the commemorations, and it has got to be said that when Labor first raised this issue in question time, about the destruction that was occurring at ANZAC Cove, the Prime Minster’s response was that it was regrettable that the question had even been asked.

The Prime Minster, John Howard, has defended his Ministers consistently throughout this whole sorry saga.

JOURNALIST: Barry Jones, the current federal President of the ALP inaudible] no significant policy debate in the ALP since 1981 [inaudible].

ALBANESE: I think that says more about Barry than it does about anything. Since 1981 we have had 13 years of the Hawke/Keating Government at which we restructured the Australian economy, at which we protected significant environment sites such as the Franklin, Kakadu and Uluru, at which we reformed the welfare-to-work structures. We currently have policies out there on a range of issues, from national security to the need to have a skilled workforce and skill up Australia. We need Australia to go the high wage, high skill road rather than the low road that is put forward by these draconian industrial relations changes put forward by the Government.

JOURNALIST: He says that you are suffering from policy anorexia.

ALBANESE: Well, Barry Jones is entitled to make whatever comments that he likes, but if you look at the range of policy areas across the board. On this area today Labor has been out there arguing for the protection of our heritage. We want to see put in place a protection plan in accordance with the Senate inquiry that was put forward last week. On the area of the environment, the most important, significant issue is climate change. Labor has policies that state that we will ratify the Kyoto Protocol; that we will increase the Mandatory Renewable Energy Target; that we would engage in terms of a reduction in our emissions by establishing a national emissions trading scheme

JOURNALIST: This is the Federal President of the ALP [inaudible].

ALBANESE: Well, if Barry Jones can argue that Labor hasn’t put forward things since 1981 I think he will be judged poorly. The fact is that we have put forward significant policies this year alone and we are putting forward policies that are filling the gaps that the Howard Government has created.

JOURNALIST: What do you think of the description that the Party is being run by factional warlords now?

ALBANESE: Barry was a member of a faction like other people. He was elected as a Minister as a member of a faction. The Liberal Party has factions. What we are seeing at the moment is the Howard faction and the Costello faction fighting it out day by day, on every policy issue, in every debate that is occurring. John Howard and Peter Costello, the backdrop of which, whether it be tax, whether it is the industrial relations changes, it is all about whether Costello has the guts to challenge Howard or not, and what the response should be.

JOURNALIST: Should Barry Jones resign from his position?

ALBANESE: Barry Jones was elected to that position. He is entitled to hold it.

JOURNALIST: So, he is entitled to hold that job and hold the views that he holds?

ALBANESE: The Labor Party is a democratic party.

JOURNALIST: But you have no problem with him staying as Federal President and holding those views?

ALBANESE: The Labor Party is a democratic party.

JOURNALIST: He says it is not. He says it is run by factional warlords like yourself.

ALBANESE: That is interesting given that he is the National President democratically elected by the Party, who came second in the ballot which all ALP members had a vote in, to Carmen Lawrence.

JOURNALIST: [inaudible]

ALBANESE: [inaudible] The real issue is Labor advancing our positive agenda and the Howard/Costello Government being in a state of internal warfare.

[ENDS]

 

Oct 9, 2005

Insiders – ‘Talking Pictures’, ABC

TRANSCRIPT OF INSIDERS PROGRAM, ABC

ANTHONY ALBANESE MP

9 October 2005

Insiders, ‘Talking Pictures’, ABC

BARRY CASSIDY: Time now for Mike Bowers and his regular segment Talking Pictures.

MICHAEL BOWERS: I’m Michael Bowers and I’m pictorial editor with the ‘Sydney Morning Herald’ newspaper. I’m Talking Pictures this morning with Anthony Albanese, Shadow Spokesperson for the Environment, Heritage and Water. Welcome to the program, Antony.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: G’day.

MICHAEL BOWERS: With cartoonist, do you have a cartoonist you particularly like the work of?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Moir I think is my favourite, in part coming from Sydney, picking up the Herald every day. I admire the fact that cartoonists can say so much in just a visual.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Well often they’re way out ahead of the commentators and the column writers. Geoff Pryor picked up a few years ago that you have an Italian heritage?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well that was at that time when there were some factional issues of which I was embroiled.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Moir has got you here, the left is sort going away and the right has got you, bullets Bonnie and Clyde style riddled with bullets.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well, we had a bit of a win and doesn’t happen all that often in doesn’t happen all that often in the NSW left, so that’s all part of the culture that’s taken in good humour.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Your wife Carmel Tebbutt is the local state member for Marrickville and my local member.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: I hope you voted for her.

MICHAEL BOWERS: I did vote.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: I’m about two streets away I believe from having you as a Federal member as your wife as a State member. How difficult is it to have a family life where you’re both in State politics you’re bringing up a child and you’re constantly one or other of you is constantly in the limelight?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well it can be hard. Managing the old diary is difficult, sitting down and making sure ure that we make time for each other and make time for Nathan our son. It can be difficult.

MICHAEL BOWERS: This is a photo of you and Joe Hockey from the 2000 Press Gallery Ball. Is politics everything we see on TV, the sort of antagonism in question time or are there true friendships across party lines?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: No it’s not. I have a great deal of respect for a whole range of people including Joe and other people in the coalition and people in politics who are there I think for the right reasons. I might disagree with where they’re coming from, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t have mutual respect for each other and certainly in terms of being an Opposition member you’ve got to approach Government ministers about seeking help for your constituents. And I think as a leftie in the Labor Party you’ve got to have faith in human beings, faith in what we can do for each other.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Well Anthony Albanese, Member for Grayndler and Opposition Spokesperson for Environment, Heritage and Water, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us this morning.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Thanks Mike

 

 

 

 

 

Oct 9, 2005

Insiders – ‘Talking Pictures’, ABC

TRANSCRIPT OF INSIDERS PROGRAM, ABC

ANTHONY ALBANESE MP

9 October 2005

Insiders, ‘Talking Pictures’, ABC

BARRY CASSIDY: Time now for Mike Bowers and his regular segment Talking Pictures.

MICHAEL BOWERS: I’m Michael Bowers and I’m pictorial editor with the ‘Sydney Morning Herald’ newspaper. I’m Talking Pictures this morning with Anthony Albanese, Shadow Spokesperson for the Environment, Heritage and Water. Welcome to the program, Antony.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: G’day.

MICHAEL BOWERS: With cartoonist, do you have a cartoonist you particularly like the work of?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Moir I think is my favourite, in part coming from Sydney, picking up the Herald every day. I admire the fact that cartoonists can say so much in just a visual.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Well often they’re way out ahead of the commentators and the column writers. Geoff Pryor picked up a few years ago that you have an Italian heritage?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well that was at that time when there were some factional issues of which I was embroiled.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Moir has got you here, the left is sort going away and the right has got you, bullets Bonnie and Clyde style riddled with bullets.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well, we had a bit of a win and doesn’t happen all that often in doesn’t happen all that often in the NSW left, so that’s all part of the culture that’s taken in good humour.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Your wife Carmel Tebbutt is the local state member for Marrickville and my local member.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: I hope you voted for her.

MICHAEL BOWERS: I did vote.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: I’m about two streets away I believe from having you as a Federal member as your wife as a State member. How difficult is it to have a family life where you’re both in State politics you’re bringing up a child and you’re constantly one or other of you is constantly in the limelight?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well it can be hard. Managing the old diary is difficult, sitting down and making sure ure that we make time for each other and make time for Nathan our son. It can be difficult.

MICHAEL BOWERS: This is a photo of you and Joe Hockey from the 2000 Press Gallery Ball. Is politics everything we see on TV, the sort of antagonism in question time or are there true friendships across party lines?

ANTHONY ALBANESE: No it’s not. I have a great deal of respect for a whole range of people including Joe and other people in the coalition and people in politics who are there I think for the right reasons. I might disagree with where they’re coming from, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t have mutual respect for each other and certainly in terms of being an Opposition member you’ve got to approach Government ministers about seeking help for your constituents. And I think as a leftie in the Labor Party you’ve got to have faith in human beings, faith in what we can do for each other.

MICHAEL BOWERS: Well Anthony Albanese, Member for Grayndler and Opposition Spokesperson for Environment, Heritage and Water, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us this morning.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Thanks Mike

 

 

 

 

 

Oct 7, 2005

ABC Radio National Breakfast AM – Postponement of Adelaide Climate Pact meeting

ABC RADIO NATIONAL BREAKFAST AM

ANTHONY ALBANESE MP

7 October 2005

Subject: Postponement of Adelaide Climate Pact meeting

PETER CAVE: The federal government is still trying to arrange the date it will hold a major meeting on climate change in Adelaide with leading Asia-Pacific nations—this despite announcing two months ago that the meeting would be held in November. Labor and the Greens say the government has failed to keep its word on when it will hold the meeting, a point they say makes a mockery of plans to present an alternative to the Kyoto protocol.

As Nick McKenzie reports from Canberra, the Foreign Minister, Alexander Downer, told parliament in early August that the high-level representations from the US, Japan, China, India and South Korea would meet in Adelaide next month.

NICK McKENZIE: Two months ago the Foreign Minister announced that the newly-formed Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate would hold its first inaugural meeting in Adelaide in November. Alexander Downer called it the most significant international meeting to ever be held in Adelaide. He also described it as the most heavy-weight delegation and event that he’d been able to attract.

Senior ministers from the US, Japan, China, India and South Korea, countries which account for almost half of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, would discuss ways to tackle climate change, using technology and voluntary partnerships. The government says the initiative is no less than a massive breakthrough in the world’s efforts to solve its biggest environmental challenge.

But now it seems the government’s plan to hold the meeting next month may not be so certain. A BBC report yesterday said the meeting had been postponed. The report said the earliest the meeting would be held was next year. The Environment Minister is Senator Ian Campbell.

IAN CAMPBELL: We’re working very hard to set a date. We had discussions, as I said, in Ottawa 10 days ago.

NICK McKENZIE: Was the federal government a little eager in saying the meeting would be held in November, now that it seems that the date is still unclear?

IAN CAMPBELL: No, all the … there’s the federal government … the governments of Japan, Australia, Korea, India, China and America. The Australian government is committed to solving the problem of climate change as are the other five governments.

NICK McKENZIE: If they’re so committed why can’t they come up with a date and lock in a date?

IAN CAMPBELL: We’re seeking to get six governments to get together with very senior level ministers from each government to make an historic breakthrough on saving the climate and saving the planet. The particular date will be announced as soon as we’ve got that date.

NICK McKENZIE: So why was there a date announced some months ago?

IAN CAMPBELL: Because six governments agreed that November is the earliest possible date that we could bring the ministers together.

NICK McKENZIE: But Alexander Downer didn’t say November would be the earliest possible date for the meeting. He said the meeting will be held in November.

IAN CAMPBELL: Well, we are committed to bringing the partnership together and making it an historic agreement to deliver real practical projects to address clean development and climate change, and the date of the meeting of the high-level ministerial segment for that partnership will be announced.

NICK McKENZIE: The opposition’s environment spokesman, Anthony Albanese, says having not signed the Kyoto protocol the government is struggling to come up with an alternative plan.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Quite clearly the dates were important. The government had to appear to be doing something, so it, with great fanfare, announced this meeting, and it would appear that this is a meeting without an agenda and now without a venue or any attendees.

NICK McKENZIE: Labor’s also angry about a comment attributed to a spokesman for Alexander Downer in an Adelaide newspaper which says that locking in the meeting has been complicated because of security concerns from ‘leftist protest groups threatening to stage demonstrations’. Labor says that’s a smoke screen. AM asked Environment Minister, Ian Campbell, about whether he was aware of any security concerns posed by protestors.

IAN CAMPBELL: Well, it’s not something I’ve turned my mind to.

PETER CAVE: The Environment Minister, Senator Ian Campbell, ending that report by Nick McKenzie in Canberra.

 

Oct 7, 2005

ABC Radio National Breakfast AM – Postponement of Adelaide Climate Pact meeting

ABC RADIO NATIONAL BREAKFAST AM

ANTHONY ALBANESE MP

7 October 2005

Subject: Postponement of Adelaide Climate Pact meeting

PETER CAVE: The federal government is still trying to arrange the date it will hold a major meeting on climate change in Adelaide with leading Asia-Pacific nations—this despite announcing two months ago that the meeting would be held in November. Labor and the Greens say the government has failed to keep its word on when it will hold the meeting, a point they say makes a mockery of plans to present an alternative to the Kyoto protocol.

As Nick McKenzie reports from Canberra, the Foreign Minister, Alexander Downer, told parliament in early August that the high-level representations from the US, Japan, China, India and South Korea would meet in Adelaide next month.

NICK McKENZIE: Two months ago the Foreign Minister announced that the newly-formed Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate would hold its first inaugural meeting in Adelaide in November. Alexander Downer called it the most significant international meeting to ever be held in Adelaide. He also described it as the most heavy-weight delegation and event that he’d been able to attract.

Senior ministers from the US, Japan, China, India and South Korea, countries which account for almost half of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, would discuss ways to tackle climate change, using technology and voluntary partnerships. The government says the initiative is no less than a massive breakthrough in the world’s efforts to solve its biggest environmental challenge.

But now it seems the government’s plan to hold the meeting next month may not be so certain. A BBC report yesterday said the meeting had been postponed. The report said the earliest the meeting would be held was next year. The Environment Minister is Senator Ian Campbell.

IAN CAMPBELL: We’re working very hard to set a date. We had discussions, as I said, in Ottawa 10 days ago.

NICK McKENZIE: Was the federal government a little eager in saying the meeting would be held in November, now that it seems that the date is still unclear?

IAN CAMPBELL: No, all the … there’s the federal government … the governments of Japan, Australia, Korea, India, China and America. The Australian government is committed to solving the problem of climate change as are the other five governments.

NICK McKENZIE: If they’re so committed why can’t they come up with a date and lock in a date?

IAN CAMPBELL: We’re seeking to get six governments to get together with very senior level ministers from each government to make an historic breakthrough on saving the climate and saving the planet. The particular date will be announced as soon as we’ve got that date.

NICK McKENZIE: So why was there a date announced some months ago?

IAN CAMPBELL: Because six governments agreed that November is the earliest possible date that we could bring the ministers together.

NICK McKENZIE: But Alexander Downer didn’t say November would be the earliest possible date for the meeting. He said the meeting will be held in November.

IAN CAMPBELL: Well, we are committed to bringing the partnership together and making it an historic agreement to deliver real practical projects to address clean development and climate change, and the date of the meeting of the high-level ministerial segment for that partnership will be announced.

NICK McKENZIE: The opposition’s environment spokesman, Anthony Albanese, says having not signed the Kyoto protocol the government is struggling to come up with an alternative plan.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: Quite clearly the dates were important. The government had to appear to be doing something, so it, with great fanfare, announced this meeting, and it would appear that this is a meeting without an agenda and now without a venue or any attendees.

NICK McKENZIE: Labor’s also angry about a comment attributed to a spokesman for Alexander Downer in an Adelaide newspaper which says that locking in the meeting has been complicated because of security concerns from ‘leftist protest groups threatening to stage demonstrations’. Labor says that’s a smoke screen. AM asked Environment Minister, Ian Campbell, about whether he was aware of any security concerns posed by protestors.

IAN CAMPBELL: Well, it’s not something I’ve turned my mind to.

PETER CAVE: The Environment Minister, Senator Ian Campbell, ending that report by Nick McKenzie in Canberra.

 

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